About

Animal welfare news: why it matters

Being bludgeoned to death without pain relief; being boiled alive; being ground up alive; being caged and deprived of adequate food; being crushed for days on end without water in lorries in a heatwave; slowly bleeding to oblivion after having your throat cut; seeing your family gunned down; having your newborn stolen – there is no end to the ways in which millions of animals suffer at the hands of humans worldwide every day.

Contrast this with how we rightly care, wherever possible, for our own species.

All because animals can’t speak for themselves.

The fact of animal sentience – the capacity to suffer just like we do – is undisputed in modern science.

But animal abuse is built into our societies, as though it has no importance.

It’s a global scandal of our time – widely misunderstood, fearfully rationalised and conveniently hidden from public view.

That’s why news about animal welfare matters, and why I report it.

But I don’t just write unquestioningly. As an award-winning Fleet Street journalist, I aim to bring perspective to the problems I write about and a more detached journalistic approach that campaigners cannot. I believe I may be even unique in combining this professional experience with writing in this specialism to bring such issues to wider attention.

Journalists have always been campaigners: indeed, it could be argued journalism was born from a need to shine a public spotlight on injustices in order to effect change, and this has given rise to some of the most memorable journalism in history. Many people are indifferent to human and animal suffering but all right-thinking people recognise right from wrong, and the more widely humanity’s wrongs are highlighted and debated, the more chance they stand of being corrected.

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2 thoughts on “About

  1. Read your excellent article on PoW dog (and intrigued by desire to correct syntax and grammar such as split infinitives and dangling participles!), which I have ordered (hopefully as good as the book on Seadog Bamse from WW2) and thought you might like a “scoop” story from the visit of the High Commissioner for New Zealand to our ANZAC ceremony on Cannock Chase (including photos) as he suggested the WW1 dog Mascot Freda should be made an Honorary Sergeant.

    Also have a story about a Bible stopping a bullet during the Battle of Loos 1915 (and just tracked the Bible down – again photos available).

    Richard Pursehouse
    thechaseproject@gmail.com
    07971-841030

    Like

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